World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Trench boot

Article Id: WHEBN0015440003
Reproduction Date:

Title: Trench boot  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Footwear, Driving moccasins, Balgha, Bakya, Roller shoe
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Trench boot

World War I soldier wearing "trench boots"

The trench boot, sometimes known as the "Pershing boot," was a combat boot used in World War I by British, American, French and Belgian forces, made for the cold mud of trench warfare.

Evolution

Introduction

The 1917 Trench Boot was an adaptation of the boots American manufacturers were selling to the French and Belgian armies at the beginning of World War I. In American service, it replaced the Russet Marching Shoe. The boot was made of tanned cowhide with a half middle sole covered by a full sole, studded with five rows of hobnails.[1] Iron plates were fixed to the heel. It was a great improvement, however it lacked waterproofing, leading to trench foot.[2]

Improvements

In January 1918 the Chief Quartermaster for the U.S. Army met with a board of officers at American Expeditionary Force Headquarters to make recommendations in order to improve the footwear of soldiers. The findings of the board were sent to General John Pershing, who approved the proposed changes. He cabled the study to The War Department for action. Shortly following, the improved 1918 Trench Boot, also called the "Pershing Boot," was first issued to personnel.[1] It used heavier leather in its construction, and had several minor changes from the 1917 Boot, including a thicker sole and improved waterproofing.[1] Due to the boots's greater size, they were known as "Little Tanks" by the soldiers who received them.[1]

References

  1. ^ a b c d Little Tanks - The American Field Shoe [Boot]
  2. ^
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from iCloud eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.