World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Lunge (fencing)

Article Id: WHEBN0006327155
Reproduction Date:

Title: Lunge (fencing)  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Fencing, Remise (fencing), Glossary of fencing, Sabre (fencing), Fencing practice and techniques
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Lunge (fencing)

Carolin Golubytskyi (R) executes a lunge as Arianna Errigo parries, final of the women's foil in the 2013 World Fencing Championships.
Raluca Cristina Sbârcia lunges at Joséphine Jacques-André-Coquin, women's épée event of the 2013 World Fencing Championships.

The lunge is the fundamental footwork technique used with all three fencing weapons: foil, épée and sabre. It is common to all contemporary fencing styles.

The lunge is executed by kicking forward with the front foot, and pushing the body forward with the back leg. It can be used in combination with different blade work to deliver an offensive action such as an attack.

The lunge is one of the most basic and most common types offensive footwork.

Contents

  • Relation to the attack 1
  • History 2
  • References 3
  • External links 4

Relation to the attack

The lunge is often used to deliver an attack. In sabre, the end of the attack is defined by the front foot of the lunge landing on the piste. An attack can be made with a lunge on its own, or can be made with a step-forward-lunge, which are both considered single tempo actions.

History

The characteristic motion of the modern lunge traces its ancestry to European swordplay of the 16th and 17th centuries. Scholars of fence such as Egerton Castle attribute the first true lunging attack to Angelo Viggiani and his Lo Schermo of 1575 (the punta supramano, or "overhand thrust"). A simple advance or pass during the thrusting attack is common as early as the Royal Armouries Ms. I.33, roughly dated to the mid-14th century.

References

  • Selberg, Charles A. (1993) The Revised Foil. ISBN 0-9638337-7-4
  • Castle, Egerton (2005) Schools and Masters of Fencing : From the Middle Ages to the Eighteenth Century, ISBN 0-486-42826-5

External links

  • Media related to Lunge (fencing) at Wikimedia Commons


This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from iCloud eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.