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Wenatchi

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Title: Wenatchi  
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Subject: Yakama Indian Reservation, Columbia-Moses language, Colville Indian Reservation, Mourning Dove (author), History of Washington (state)
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Wenatchi

Wenatchi
Regions with significant populations
 United States (Washington)
Languages
English, Salishan, Interior Salish
Related ethnic groups
Colville, Sanpoil, Nespelem, Palus, Sinixt, Entiat, Methow, Southern Okanagan, Sinkiuse-Columbia, and the Nez Perce of Chief Joseph's band

The Wenatchi people are a group of Native Americans who originally lived in the region near the confluence of the Columbia and Wenatchee Rivers in Eastern Washington State. The Wenatchis (or "P'squosa") were not given reservation land by the federal government, and subsequently, most modern day Wenatchis are found living on the Colville Indian Reservation, with a small number living on the Yakama Reservation. They spoke Interior Salish (a variant of Salish) and ate salmon, camas root, berries, and deer. The Wenatchi tribe were closely allied with the Spokane tribes.

Further reading

  • Chalfant, Stuart A. Ethnohistorical Reports on Aboriginal Land Use and Occupancy: Spokan Indians, Palus Indians, Columbia Salish, Wenatchi Salish. Interior Salish and eastern Washington Indians, 4. New York: Garland Pub. Inc, 1974. ISBN 0-8240-0782-4
  • Gardner, Grace Christiansen. Life Among North Central Washington First Families - the Red Men. [Wenatchee: The Daily World, 1935.
  • Marshall, Maureen E. Wenatchee's Dark Past. Wenatchee, Wash: The Wenatchee World, 2008.
  • Scheuerman, Richard D. The Wenatchi Indians: Guardians of the Valley. Fairfield, Wash: Ye Galleon Press, 1982. ISBN 0-87770-287-X
  • Scheuerman, Richard D., John Clement, and Clifford E. Trafzer. The Wenatchee Valley and Its First Peoples: Thrilling Grandeur, Unfulfilled Promise. Wenatchee, Wash: Wenatchee Valley Museum & Cultural Center, 2005. ISBN 0-9763591-0-3
  • Smythe, Charles W., and Priya Helweg. Summary of Ethnological Objects in the National Museum of Natural History Associated with the Wenatchi Culture. Washington, D.C.: Repatriation Office, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, 1996.

External links


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